Weaving Movements Newsletter 2018: Youth and Parents Organize in Mojave Unified School District

This year, Carol Watkins, California City Organizer, helped to organize and establish the first predominantly African-American Vecinos Unidos(Neighbors United) Chapter. DHF has been working closely with youth and parents to address the discipline crisis in the Mojave Unified School District (MUSD). As a result, the district agreed to create an African-American Parent Committee. MUSD has the highest suspension rate of African-American students in the state. A shocking 81% of African American students were suspended or expelled in the 2014-15 school year.

California City Vecinos achieved great victories through parent engagement and advocacy in the LCAP process. Harshly affected by zero-tolerance policies and the pushout of African American students, parents organized and submitted recommendations to MUSD. Among these recommendations were the removal of security resource officers on campus, changing the grading system to make it more fair, increasing funds for cultural awareness, and more. Although not all recommendations were adopted, MUSD has allocated funds towards implicit bias training for teachers, curriculum on the African American experience, and hiring teachers of color.

 

Weaving Movements Newsletter 2018: Mapping Social Justice with GIS

In May 2018, the Dolores Huerta Foundation (DHF) and Vecinos Unidos(Neighbors United) of Lamont and Arvin pushed for fairer representation on the Kern High School District (KHSD) Board of Trustees. DHF’s new Geographic Information Systems (GIS) team was able to gather population data and develop a variety of maps to present its case for better representation on the KHSD’s Board. DHF’s GIS Analyst developed a map that showcased the Latino’s population growth in Kern County on the school district’s map using information from the American Community Survey. The proposed DHF map highlighted the residence of three trustees, all who live within a three-mile radius from one another in the wealthiest, affluent area of Northwest Bakersfield. These tools helped the community understand how KHSD gerrymandered boundaries which resulted in the centralized power of the white minority, thereby systematically denying the just representation of historically disenfranchised communities of color. The DHF and communities attended board meetings to advocate for an additional Latino-majority district and the grouping of communities of interest to prevent further gerrymandering and to distribute power fairly across communities served by KHSD. The maps created by the DHF’s GIS team were presented at board meetings to counter the maps being presented by the KHSD. In the end, the Kern County Committee on School District Organization (KCCSDO), the entity with the final say, voted to implement a school district map that was proposed by the KHSD Board of Trustees and made no major changes to decentralizing power concentrated in Northwest Bakersfield. The DHF and Vecinosattained a second Latino-majority district, although more needs to be done to end underrepresentation on boards that impact the education inequities in Kern County.

 

Weaving Movements Newsletter 2018: Schools and Communities First Civic Engagement

The DHF staff and 136 volunteers collected more than 3,000 signatures for the petition to qualify the Schools and Communities First Initiative for the November 2020 ballot, surpassing its organizational goal. The DHF in partnership with California Calls hopes to fund our schools and local communities by closing California’s massive corporate loophole. The initiative, if passed, will increase state revenue by making corporations pay their fair share of commercial property taxes. California is the 5th largest economy in the world; we should be able to pay for world-class schools, health care for all, safe neighborhoods, and affordable housing. Closing the corporate loophole will reclaim $11 billion every year for our schools and communities. This means we can restore our emergency responder services, parks and libraries, health clinics and trauma centers, housing development and services for the homeless, infrastructure, and local schools and community colleges.

Read 

Muchas Gracias!

Thank you for being a part of this movement! I feel honored and privileged to spend my days working together to inspire and organize communities to build volunteer-based organizations empowered to pursue social justice.

¡Sí Se Puede!

Dolores Huerta

DHF Civic Engagement Amigo Thank You! DHF Civic Engagement Fundraiser, Tues. 10/9, 5:30pm

Thank for your generous tax deductible contribution to the Dolores Huerta Foundation’s Central Valley Integrative Voter Engagement Project!. TAX ID #91-2145992

With the invaluable support of donors like you, the Dolores Huerta Foundation (DHF) has made great strides in recruiting, training, and developing grassroots volunteers to engage in voter outreach and education efforts. You can read more about it here Dolores Huerta Foundation Civic Engagement Program.

The stakes are incredibly high, this election year.  Every vote will matter and every eligible voter must be given the opportunity to vote.

Latinos in three critical Central Valley counties — Kern, Tulare and Fresno — have, historically been left out of conventional voter outreach efforts.  They represent tens of thousands of potential votes, but are often overlooked because they live in more rural areas.

With your help, the Dolores Huerta Foundation will educate and mobilize these voters!  Proceeds from this timely event will enable much-needed expansion and acceleration of the important work of the Foundation’s Integrated Voter Engagement (IVE) project.

Since 2003, the Dolores Huerta Foundation [a 501(c)3] has been organizing at the grassroots level to develop natural leaders as community organizers, establish Vecinos Unidos (United Neighbors) chapters, and inspire communities to build volunteer organizations empowered to pursue social justice.

IVE enables them to engage and educate underserved prospective voters in their own neighborhoods through a variety of tactics, including door-to-door canvassing, phone banking, texting, social media, and public forums.  With your support, they will leverage the organizing framework they have already built by implementing IVE in Arvin, Lamont, Bakersfield, California City, Lindsay, Woodlake, Sanger and Parlier.

Thank You! DHF Civic Engagement Fundraiser, Tues. 10/9, 5:30pm

Thank for your generous tax deductible contribution to the Dolores Huerta Foundation’s Central Valley Integrative Voter Engagement Project!. TAX ID #91-2145992

We look forward to seeing on Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Event information:

Time: 5:30 to 8:30 pm  (program starts promptly at 5:45)

Location: East Bay Community Foundation, 353 Frank Ogawa Plaza (near Oakland City Hall)

BART: 12th Street BART station (1 block away)

Parking: There are several public parking garages, nearby.  Be sure to check closing times.

Refreshments will be served.

You will hear from the trusted and influential DHF organizers that live and work in communities in the southern Central Valley. Learn how they have organized neighbors throughout the region and plans for expanding their connections and reach to increase political power.

With the invaluable support of donors like you, the Dolores Huerta Foundation (DHF) has made great strides in recruiting, training, and developing grassroots volunteers to engage in voter outreach and education efforts. You can read more about it here Dolores Huerta Foundation Civic Engagement Program.

The stakes are incredibly high, this election year.  Every vote will matter and every eligible voter must be given the opportunity to vote.

Latinos in three critical Central Valley counties — Kern, Tulare and Fresno — have, historically been left out of conventional voter outreach efforts.  They represent tens of thousands of potential votes, but are often overlooked because they live in more rural areas.

With your help, the Dolores Huerta Foundation will educate and mobilize these voters!  Proceeds from this timely event will enable much-needed expansion and acceleration of the important work of the Foundation’s Integrated Voter Engagement (IVE) project.

Since 2003, the Dolores Huerta Foundation [a 501(c)3] has been organizing at the grassroots level to develop natural leaders as community organizers, establish Vecinos Unidos (United Neighbors) chapters, and inspire communities to build volunteer organizations empowered to pursue social justice.

IVE enables them to engage and educate underserved prospective voters in their own neighborhoods through a variety of tactics, including door-to-door canvassing, phone banking, texting, social media, and public forums.  With your support, they will leverage the organizing framework they have already built by implementing IVE in Arvin, Lamont, Bakersfield, California City, Lindsay, Woodlake, Sanger and Parlier.

We believe you will leave this event understanding that the Central Valley is on the move and that you can help accelerate their progress!

Please share this invitation with your family, friends and employers!

Program

5:30 to 8:30 PM

Panel Discussion (with audience participation)

National and state leaders have abdicated their roles, so local leaders are taking on the challenges.  Central Valley community leaders discuss the region’s evolving political landscape. Our goal is to elevate their solutions.  

Fred Ross, Jr., Moderator (Community Organizer and Son of Fred Ross, Sr.)

Camila Chavez, Executive Director, Dolores Huerta Foundation

Pam Whalen, Organizing Director, Dolores Huerta Foundation

Timoteo Prado, South Kern Organizer, Dolores Huerta Foundation

  • Followed by a Special Screening of “DOLORES”, a documentary film about Dolores Huerta’s life as a community organizer and labor leader.

    This inspiring film presents an instructive view of her ongoing strategy for building leadership and empowering people.  More information is available here.