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Celebrate Dolores Huerta’s 88th Birthday 4/10/18!

Celebrate Dolores Huerta’s 88th Birthday 4/10/18!

Today, April 10th 2018, Dolores Huerta celebrates her 88th year of life and continues her lifelong legacy of social justice.

You can make one of Dolores’ birthday wishes come true by supporting the community organizing work of the Dolores Huerta Foundation! Donate at Give2DHF.org

The first 88 people to donate $88, or more, will receive a commemorative mug and a photo of Dolores.

Anyone who donates $888 dollars, or more, before the end of the year (12/31/2018) will receive a commemorative mug, a photo of Dolores, a personalized video message, and a signed DVD or Blu Ray copy of “Dolores” the critically acclaimed documentary about Dolores’ life – produced by Carlos Santana and directed by Peter Bratt.

Donate at Give2DHF.org

You can make another wish come true by registering to vote and voting in every election!

Thank you! Muchas Gracias!

We appreciate all you do to work for justice. We are proud to stand with you in expanding the organizing power of our communities to make real and lasting change. We hope you’ll take a moment to read our Weaving Movements Newsletter and find out about all the gains the Vecinos Unidos (Neighbors United) have made by engaging with school boards to push for education reform to achieve better academic outcomes for their children, in advocating to local elected boards to demand fair and just representation, and increasing voter participation in the 2018 Midterm Elections. We held our first Annual Vecinos Unidos Leadership Conference, bringing together youth and adult leaders from the nine Vecinos Unidoschapters in Kern, Tulare, and Fresno counties.

We are pleased to share the launch of our Youth and Family Civic Engagement Initiative (YFCEI) in partnership with Martin Luther King Jr. Freedom Center. We are developing the leaders of the future. These young people are learning about civic institutions, public speaking, and developing an understanding of meaningful leadership and self-expression through art and poetry and hands on civic engagement opportunities.

Governor Brown has declared April 10th Dolores Huerta in the state of California. We hope we can count on you to help us make this a day that extends beyond California to inspire people to learn more about the power of grassroots community organizing and to volunteer in service of their local communities.

We share our excitement and gratitude with you as we celebrate 15 years of organizing communities to pursue justice and look hopefully towards the future!

¡Si Se Puede!

Dolores Huerta 

Weaving Movements Newsletter 2018: Youth and Parents Organize in Mojave Unified School District

This year, Carol Watkins, California City Organizer, helped to organize and establish the first predominantly African-American Vecinos Unidos(Neighbors United) Chapter. DHF has been working closely with youth and parents to address the discipline crisis in the Mojave Unified School District (MUSD). As a result, the district agreed to create an African-American Parent Committee. MUSD has the highest suspension rate of African-American students in the state. A shocking 81% of African American students were suspended or expelled in the 2014-15 school year.

California City Vecinos achieved great victories through parent engagement and advocacy in the LCAP process. Harshly affected by zero-tolerance policies and the pushout of African American students, parents organized and submitted recommendations to MUSD. Among these recommendations were the removal of security resource officers on campus, changing the grading system to make it more fair, increasing funds for cultural awareness, and more. Although not all recommendations were adopted, MUSD has allocated funds towards implicit bias training for teachers, curriculum on the African American experience, and hiring teachers of color.

 

Weaving Movements Newsletter 2018: Mapping Social Justice with GIS

In May 2018, the Dolores Huerta Foundation (DHF) and Vecinos Unidos(Neighbors United) of Lamont and Arvin pushed for fairer representation on the Kern High School District (KHSD) Board of Trustees. DHF’s new Geographic Information Systems (GIS) team was able to gather population data and develop a variety of maps to present its case for better representation on the KHSD’s Board. DHF’s GIS Analyst developed a map that showcased the Latino’s population growth in Kern County on the school district’s map using information from the American Community Survey. The proposed DHF map highlighted the residence of three trustees, all who live within a three-mile radius from one another in the wealthiest, affluent area of Northwest Bakersfield. These tools helped the community understand how KHSD gerrymandered boundaries which resulted in the centralized power of the white minority, thereby systematically denying the just representation of historically disenfranchised communities of color. The DHF and communities attended board meetings to advocate for an additional Latino-majority district and the grouping of communities of interest to prevent further gerrymandering and to distribute power fairly across communities served by KHSD. The maps created by the DHF’s GIS team were presented at board meetings to counter the maps being presented by the KHSD. In the end, the Kern County Committee on School District Organization (KCCSDO), the entity with the final say, voted to implement a school district map that was proposed by the KHSD Board of Trustees and made no major changes to decentralizing power concentrated in Northwest Bakersfield. The DHF and Vecinosattained a second Latino-majority district, although more needs to be done to end underrepresentation on boards that impact the education inequities in Kern County.

 

Weaving Movements Newsletter 2018: Schools and Communities First Civic Engagement

The DHF staff and 136 volunteers collected more than 3,000 signatures for the petition to qualify the Schools and Communities First Initiative for the November 2020 ballot, surpassing its organizational goal. The DHF in partnership with California Calls hopes to fund our schools and local communities by closing California’s massive corporate loophole. The initiative, if passed, will increase state revenue by making corporations pay their fair share of commercial property taxes. California is the 5th largest economy in the world; we should be able to pay for world-class schools, health care for all, safe neighborhoods, and affordable housing. Closing the corporate loophole will reclaim $11 billion every year for our schools and communities. This means we can restore our emergency responder services, parks and libraries, health clinics and trauma centers, housing development and services for the homeless, infrastructure, and local schools and community colleges.

Read 

Muchas Gracias!

Thank you for being a part of this movement! I feel honored and privileged to spend my days working together to inspire and organize communities to build volunteer-based organizations empowered to pursue social justice.

¡Sí Se Puede!

Dolores Huerta

DHF Civic Engagement Amigo Thank You! DHF Civic Engagement Fundraiser, Tues. 10/9, 5:30pm

Thank for your generous tax deductible contribution to the Dolores Huerta Foundation’s Central Valley Integrative Voter Engagement Project!. TAX ID #91-2145992

With the invaluable support of donors like you, the Dolores Huerta Foundation (DHF) has made great strides in recruiting, training, and developing grassroots volunteers to engage in voter outreach and education efforts. You can read more about it here Dolores Huerta Foundation Civic Engagement Program.

The stakes are incredibly high, this election year.  Every vote will matter and every eligible voter must be given the opportunity to vote.

Latinos in three critical Central Valley counties — Kern, Tulare and Fresno — have, historically been left out of conventional voter outreach efforts.  They represent tens of thousands of potential votes, but are often overlooked because they live in more rural areas.

With your help, the Dolores Huerta Foundation will educate and mobilize these voters!  Proceeds from this timely event will enable much-needed expansion and acceleration of the important work of the Foundation’s Integrated Voter Engagement (IVE) project.

Since 2003, the Dolores Huerta Foundation [a 501(c)3] has been organizing at the grassroots level to develop natural leaders as community organizers, establish Vecinos Unidos (United Neighbors) chapters, and inspire communities to build volunteer organizations empowered to pursue social justice.

IVE enables them to engage and educate underserved prospective voters in their own neighborhoods through a variety of tactics, including door-to-door canvassing, phone banking, texting, social media, and public forums.  With your support, they will leverage the organizing framework they have already built by implementing IVE in Arvin, Lamont, Bakersfield, California City, Lindsay, Woodlake, Sanger and Parlier.

Thank You! DHF Civic Engagement Fundraiser, Tues. 10/9, 5:30pm

Thank for your generous tax deductible contribution to the Dolores Huerta Foundation’s Central Valley Integrative Voter Engagement Project!. TAX ID #91-2145992

We look forward to seeing on Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Event information:

Time: 5:30 to 8:30 pm  (program starts promptly at 5:45)

Location: East Bay Community Foundation, 353 Frank Ogawa Plaza (near Oakland City Hall)

BART: 12th Street BART station (1 block away)

Parking: There are several public parking garages, nearby.  Be sure to check closing times.

Refreshments will be served.

You will hear from the trusted and influential DHF organizers that live and work in communities in the southern Central Valley. Learn how they have organized neighbors throughout the region and plans for expanding their connections and reach to increase political power.

With the invaluable support of donors like you, the Dolores Huerta Foundation (DHF) has made great strides in recruiting, training, and developing grassroots volunteers to engage in voter outreach and education efforts. You can read more about it here Dolores Huerta Foundation Civic Engagement Program.

The stakes are incredibly high, this election year.  Every vote will matter and every eligible voter must be given the opportunity to vote.

Latinos in three critical Central Valley counties — Kern, Tulare and Fresno — have, historically been left out of conventional voter outreach efforts.  They represent tens of thousands of potential votes, but are often overlooked because they live in more rural areas.

With your help, the Dolores Huerta Foundation will educate and mobilize these voters!  Proceeds from this timely event will enable much-needed expansion and acceleration of the important work of the Foundation’s Integrated Voter Engagement (IVE) project.

Since 2003, the Dolores Huerta Foundation [a 501(c)3] has been organizing at the grassroots level to develop natural leaders as community organizers, establish Vecinos Unidos (United Neighbors) chapters, and inspire communities to build volunteer organizations empowered to pursue social justice.

IVE enables them to engage and educate underserved prospective voters in their own neighborhoods through a variety of tactics, including door-to-door canvassing, phone banking, texting, social media, and public forums.  With your support, they will leverage the organizing framework they have already built by implementing IVE in Arvin, Lamont, Bakersfield, California City, Lindsay, Woodlake, Sanger and Parlier.

We believe you will leave this event understanding that the Central Valley is on the move and that you can help accelerate their progress!

Please share this invitation with your family, friends and employers!

Program

5:30 to 8:30 PM

Panel Discussion (with audience participation)

National and state leaders have abdicated their roles, so local leaders are taking on the challenges.  Central Valley community leaders discuss the region’s evolving political landscape. Our goal is to elevate their solutions.  

Fred Ross, Jr., Moderator (Community Organizer and Son of Fred Ross, Sr.)

Camila Chavez, Executive Director, Dolores Huerta Foundation

Pam Whalen, Organizing Director, Dolores Huerta Foundation

Timoteo Prado, South Kern Organizer, Dolores Huerta Foundation

  • Followed by a Special Screening of “DOLORES”, a documentary film about Dolores Huerta’s life as a community organizer and labor leader.

    This inspiring film presents an instructive view of her ongoing strategy for building leadership and empowering people.  More information is available here.

DHF in Action: “Stand Up, Speak Out” Pride March, 6/11/17

On the morning of June 11th, the Dolores Huerta Foundation and Bakersfield LGBTQ hosted Bakersfield’s first ever LGBT Pride March, the “Stand Up, Speak Out March!” The “Stand Up, Speak Out March” was one of hundreds of marches that took place across the nation in solidarity with the National Equality March that took place on the same day in Washington D.C.

The “Stand Up, Speak Out March” was held to memorialize the 49 victims of the June 12th, 2016 massacre at Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Florida, the largest hate crime directed at the LGBTQ community in the United States.

Over 100 community members marched with the Dolores Huerta Foundation from Stockdale Highway and California Avenue to the First Congregational Church. At the church, speakers addressed each of the march’s demands and sought to mobilize people into action to support health care for all, embrace trans people, fight bi-erasure, validate non-binary people, end stigma of HIV, and to stop the Chechen genocide of gay and bisexual men.

Further, attendees were asked to sign legislation support cards asking their Senators and Assemblymembers to support legislation such as SB 179, the Gender Recognition Act, SB 239 Modernizing Discriminatory HIV Criminalization Laws, and SB 421 Tiered System for California Sex Offender Registry.

SB 179 creates a third gender marker on California identification documents allowing non-binary people to have identification that accurately matches their gender identity.

SB 239 modernizes California laws criminalizing and stigmatizing people living with HIV to reflect current understanding of HIV prevention and treatment. It eliminates HIV-specific criminal laws that impose harsh and draconian penalties, including for activities that pose no risk of transmitting HIV.

SB 421 would replace California’s existing universal lifetime registration requirement for sex offenses with a tiered system based on the seriousness of the crime, the risk of reoffending and criminal history.

A total of 184 cards in support of SB 179,  164 cards in support of SB 239, and 118 cards in support of SB 421 were collected and sent to Assemblymember Salas, Assemblymember Fong, Senator Vidak, and Senator Fuller.

 

DHF in Action: 2nd Annual LGBTQ Youth Summit, 3/4/17

On March 4, 2017, the Dolores Huerta Foundation was a co-organizer with other agencies working for LGBTQ youth for the 2nd Annual LGBTQ Youth Summit held at California State University Bakersfield. Teens 4 Equality leaders participated in the planning of the youth summit by outlining the topics that they would like to learn more about and that would benefit their peers. Over Sixty middle and high school students attended workshops about topics such as educational rights for LGBTQ students, family acceptance, LGBTQ history, mental health, healthy relationships and much more.

Teen leaders Nena, Paola, Chyna and Emily presented a workshop for youth and adult participants about LGBTQ identities, terminology, the different parts of identity, and how LGBTQ and allied youth can become more engaged with the community through the Dolores Huerta Foundation’s Teens 4 Equality program.

“Presenting at the Youth Summit gave me an opportunity to talk about what I felt was important. As well as allowing me to talk with other people my age who have some of the same values as me” Youth Leader Chyna Patz

Additionally, the youth summit included a drag show with local drag queens after the workshop programming had concluded.

Sundance Film Festival announces first wave of 2017 films – U.S. DOCUMENTARY COMPETITION – Dolores / U.S.A. (Director: Peter Bratt)

Sundance Film Festival announces first wave of 2017 films – U.S. DOCUMENTARY COMPETITION – Dolores / U.S.A. (Director: Peter Bratt)

Dolores Huerta bucks 1950s gender conventions by co-founding the country’s first farmworkers’ union. Wrestling with raising 11 children, gender bias, union defeat and victory, and nearly dying after a San Francisco Police beating, Dolores emerges with a vision that connects her newfound feminism with racial and class justice. World Premiere

dh-with-bullhorn-2

Dolores Huerta and the Dolores Huerta Foundation Mourn the Loss of John Edward (Jack) Brigham

Dolores Huerta and the Dolores Huerta Foundation Mourn the Loss of John Edward (Jack) Brigham

Jack and Dolores

 

It is with heavy hearts that we share the sad news of the passing of our dear friend, and brother in the movement, Jack Brigham. He was a great humanist and a great educator. He was completely devoted to young people, especially students. He was a Dolores Huerta Foundation Board Member and extremely generous with his resources in supporting the foundation. He was a progressive leader in Kern County and a friend of labor and a proponent of workers’ rights. He was one of the earliest supporters of the United Farm Workers. As a part of the Teachers’ Union he served as President of the Central Labor Council. His life was one of giving, of himself, of his knowledge, and his resources to improve the lives of so many and make Kern County a more progressive community. He will be sorely missed and it will take many people to fill his shoes. His life serves as an inspiration to others. Our prayers are with his family and loved ones. ¡JACK BRIGHAM, PRESENTE!

~ Dolores Huerta

John Edward (Jack) BRIGHAM has lost his battle with cancer on July 7th, 2016. He will be missed by many.

Born August 24, 1946, in East Moline, Illinois, he was the second child and only son to Edward Case Brigham and Winifred Edith McCool Brigham. At the time of his birth, his parents and older sister, Judy, lived in Palos Heights, Ill. His father, Ed, was a pilot for American Airlines. In 1949 they moved to Taft, CA, where Ed began work for Sparkle Cleaners, Winnie began teaching Kindergarten and his sister, Ann, was born. In 1957 his family moved to East Bakersfield, where Ed became manager of the new Bakersfield branch of Sparkle Cleaners, and Winnie continued teaching.

His greatest influences during his formative years were his grandfather, Dr. David John Brigham, a Presbyterian minister, his parents, Ed and Winnie, his sisters, Ann and Judy, his friends and teachers.

Jack attended Horace Mann Elementary School and Sierra Junior High, entering East Bakersfield High School as a freshman in 1959. While attending East High, he became an Eagle Scout, the student body president, and an all city basketball player. Ward Fulcher, his Humanities teacher, and Ralph Krafve, his varsity basketball coach, were his most influential EB teachers. He graduated in l964 and enrolled at UC Santa Barbara, where he received a B.A. degree in history and political science. Later he earned a Masters degree in History from Cal State Bakersfield

During his four years at UCSB he was an Alpha Delta Phi leader and participated in the intra mural programs. Following his graduation, he returned to Bakersfield and became a BCSD teacher at Lincoln Junior High, where also coached the Jr. Optimist basketball teams and became a lifetime PTA honoree.

In July, 1969, he was at Fraternal Hall when Bakersfield City Police officers assaulted the youth and chaperones at a Bakersfield Recreation Department public dance for youth. After testifying in front of the Grand Jury and in court, he dedicated his life to public education and social justice. He found the inner courage to speak truth to power with integrity.

During his 20 years as a BCSD teacher he coached many outstanding Kern athletes, including Dean Jones, who became top Junior College basketball player in California during his sophomore year at Bakersfield College.

He also became a leader in the Kern Council for Civic Unity, a leader and state vice president of the Bakersfield Federation of Teachers, AFT AFL-CLO, and the President of the Kern, Inyo, and Mono counties’ Central Labor Council for two terms. In addition he edited the Kern, Inyo, and Mono counties’ Central Labor Council publications.

At the age of 42 he became a History and Political Science professor at Bakersfield College under the mentorship of Dr. David Rosales. The students voted him their outstanding professor at the end of his first year, and as the Sam McCall Award Winner, he had the honor of being a BC graduation speaker to the class of 1991.

While at BC, his most unique award was being selected a member of a group of 50 who represented outstanding leaders during Bakersfield’s first 100 years. He was also awarded the Beautiful Bakersfield Individual Humanitarian Award. He was honored at the Renegades’ 100 year celebration as being one of the top influences in BC history, and in addition was presented with the George White Award and served as the Grand Marshall of both the East Bakersfield High School and Bakersfield College homecomings.
In 2000 he asked his close friends, Milt Younger and Harvey Hall, if they would co-found the BC Center for Kern Political Education as a nonpartisan BC foundation.
The center they created hosted speakers, as well as provided annual We The People conferences for Kern youth and their coaches, annual Sacramento trips and annual youth-community leader honoree dinners. It also funded internships for many Kern youth.

Following his retirement, he co-founded PEAK (Progressive Education and Action in Kern) with Kim Schaefer and Tom Webster. PEAK interns continue to create a weekly flyer and Issues Quarterly Magazine. In addition Jack has been part of the Dolores Huerta Foundation Board of Directors and was honored as Chamber of Commerce Humanitarian-of-the-year.
On December 19, 2015, his former BC student and honorary family member, Abdallah Ben-Hamallah, gave a health center to the community of Malika, Senegal, that will serve approximately 100,000 people each year. It is named Brigham and Younger Health Center in honor of Jack Brigham and his mentor of more than four decades, Milt Younger.

Justice Thurgood Marshall’s words, “He did the best he could with what he had.” are the best words he would use to summarize his life. He was able to live his dreams because of the love, inspiration and encouragement of his friends.
In addition to those identified previously he loved his working meals with his close friends, Bob Severs, Bakersfield Sister City leader John Hefner, 2012 U.S. Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient Dolores Huerta, and Bakersfield’s “Mother Teresa” Wendy Wayne.

Jack leaves behind countless friends, admirers, colleagues and former students whom he has helped over his career. Those who knew him feel privileged and grateful to have known a man dedicated totally to the betterment of his community and human kind. His passion was fostering learning and personal growth in his students, assuming the role of father, mentor, friend, support figure for countless young people.
Jack is succeeded by family members, who include his sisters, Margaret Ann Brigham Pool (husband, Gary) of Council, Idaho, and Judith Brigham Sims-Barlow (husband, William Barlow) of La Veta, Colorado; his nieces, Gina Pool (of Springfield, Nebraska) and Amy Sims (of Denver, Colorado); nephews, Chris Pool (wife Lisa of Springfield, NE) and Jay Sims (wife Cathy of Westminster, Colorado); and grand nephew, Chevalier Case Gordon (Gina’s son of Springfield, Nebraska).

The family would like to extend a special thank you to Bakersfield Memorial Hospital and Gentiva Hospice for their attentiveness and caring staff. Jack especially enjoyed Gentiva’s Adrianna during her home visits and help.

In lieu of a service or ceremony, Jack is in hopes his friends and role models will do something special for a person, group or organization in the spirit of integrity and civic unity. A Jack Brigham Scholarship Fund is in the process of being established. Donations to this fund or to any charitable or scholarship fund of your choice would be of benefit to others and appreciated.

Dolores Huerta and the Dolores Huerta Foundation Mourn the Loss of Helen Chavez

Dolores Huerta and the Dolores Huerta Foundation Mourn the Loss of Helen Chavez

I am heartbroken by Helen Chavez’s passing. She was a dear friend whom I admired and cared for deeply. She was the godmother of my son Emilio Huerta and a great support for all of my children, especially during the early years when we struggled against great obstacles to form the United Farm Workers.

Helen was a loving wife, mother, grandmother, sister and friend to many. She will be dearly missed. My prayers and deepest condolences are with her family during this difficult time.

Helen was somewhat of a reluctant hero who always believed she was just doing her job. She served her family and the United Farm Workers humbly and diligently. She managed their home life to free her husband, the late Cesar Chavez, for the important work of organizing. She was a rock and the unwavering foundation of the UFW. Cesar could not have accomplished all that he did without her physical and emotional support. She also supported the volunteers and staff of the UFW. She made sure Cesar’s legacy would continue in his children and grandchildren.

As much as Helen cherished her privacy, she always made time for marches and picket lines. Although she disdained publicity, she didn’t hesitate to lend her voice to a good cause. For instance, she recently spoke out in a campaign appealing to the New York Times to stop using ethnic and racial stereotypes. She called on them to use the word “undocumented” instead of “illegal” when referring to farm workers and Latinos immigrants.

While we mourn the loss of an incredible woman, we also celebrate her remarkable life and hope that it serves as an example to young people everywhere to work hard and dedicate themselves to selflessly serve a cause greater than themselves.

We can honor Helen’s example of service, accomplishment and modesty, by continuing to work for that which she and Cesar dedicated their lives to: promoting the civil rights of others and pursuing social justice for all. !Si Se Puede! – Dolores Huerta

Photo credit: C. Legerrette - Dolores Huerta and Helen Chavez taken at the 50th Anniversary Convention of the UFW

Photo credit: Carlos LeGerrette – Dolores Huerta & Helen Chavez. Los Angeles 2001

America’s Social Arsonist: Fred Ross and Grassroots Organizing in the Twentieth Century Now Available

America’s Social Arsonist: Fred Ross and Grassroots Organizing in the Twentieth Century Now Available

8834a816d5e92d9d279935d7_372x560Today, America’s Social Arsonist: Fred Ross and Grassroots Organizing in the Twentieth Century is now available to purchase online and at your local bookstore.

This first biography of my father is very readable and it’s telling of why my father became an organizer and how his efforts were impacted by the historic times in which he lived. Labor journalist and author Gabriel Thompson shares the stories of the courageous men and women who my father trained to become leaders in the fight for social justice. Amongst those he mentored were some of the most influential organizers in American history including Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta. Thompson helps to recover a forgotten chapter of American history and provides vital lessons for all organizers today.

Take a look at this great review for America’s Social Arsonist in the San Francisco Chronicle!

You can order your own copy of America’s Social Arsonist: Fred Ross and Grassroots Organizing in the Twentieth Century here online or pick one up at your local bookstore.

I would be grateful to have your help spread the word of the book’s release to all your friends and family.

There’s also currently a special, limited-time promotion through UC Press, which is offering a 30% off the price of the book. You can purchase the book at this website and enter the code “16M4197” to receive the discount.

You can also follow’s the book’s Facebook page here.

If you would like to host a book event, class presentation, web discussion or anything else, please email thompson.gabriel@gmail.com.

In Solidarity,
Fred

Dolores Huerta and the DHF mourn the passing of Vice President, Deacon Sal Alvarez

Dolores Huerta and the DHF mourn the passing of Vice President, Deacon Sal Alvarez

It is with heavy hearts that we mourn the passing of our Vice President, Deacon Salvador Alvarez. Sal was an educator, activist, and leader in the faith community. “He was a selfless person who worked tirelessly, giving totally of himself to improve the lives of youth and communities of color,” said President, Dolores Huerta

He played a pivotal role in the passage of IRCA, The Immigration Reform Act of 1986 which gave amnesty to millions of undocumented residents. He was a founder of the Hispanic Round Table in San Jose, which advocated for the Latino community. Their collaboration with Harvard University accomplished major changes in the practices of the Juvenile Court system to end discrimination against Latino and African American youth.

Sal worked as a legislative advocate to protect the Agricultural Labor Relations act. Prior to becoming ill, he was working full time on legislation to reform California’s worker’s compensation laws.

His widow, Sylvia Alvarez has asked that we share the following message:

My beloved husband was called home by God on Sunday evening, June 7, 2015, the Feast of Corpus Cristi. Our family is grateful for the outpouring of love and respect for Sal’s life as an instrument of the Holy Spirit.

On behalf of my family, I kindly ask that you please widely disseminate the following information for Sal’s funeral services.

The Vigil will be held
at 7pm on Tuesday, June 16, 2015
St. John Vianney Catholic Church
4600 Hyland Avenue
San Jose 95127

The Mass of Christian Burial will be concelebrated by Bishop Patrick J. McGrath of the Diocese of San Jose and Bishop Richard Garcia of the Diocese of Monterey
at 11am on Wednesday, June 17, 2015
St. John Vianney Catholic Church
4600 Hyland Avenue
San Jose 95127

With gratitude,
Sylvia

To read more about Sal’s life and work, see links for the following articles:

Farm worker champion Sal Alvarez: A life grounded in faith and service

Sal Alvarez, Catholic deacon and social activist in San Jose, dies

sal_alvarez