¡SÍ SE PUEDE! AT 90: ROSARIO DAWSON, CARLOS SANTANA, SALMA HAYEK AND MORE JOIN ACTIVIST DOLORES HUERTA’S 90TH BIRTHDAY ONLINE COVID-19 BENEFIT

MEDIA CONTACT: Damairis Lao | dlao@doloreshuerta.org

[BAKERSFIELD, CA] THURSDAY, MAY 28, 2020- In celebration of the iconic American labor leader and civil rights activist Dolores Huerta’s 90th birthday, the Dolores Huerta Foundation is bringing celebrities, elected officials and activists together to raise money to relieve the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic in regions where politically disempowered, low-income, immigrant, and farmworker groups are being disproportionately affected.

“In my 90 years, I have seen the progress in our country towards improvements for women, our LGBTQ+ community and people of color, but we know we have not yet achieved the equity we deserve. So as we go forward for the next century, we can learn from the lessons of the past to reimagine and shape the future for a world that is just and fair for all,” Huerta stated.

The digital event will be streamed on all of DHF’s major social platforms including YouTube, Facebook, Instagram and Twitter on Saturday, May 30 beginning at 5:00 pm PDT / 8:00 pm EDT and will be hosted by renowned comedian, actress, and writer Cristela Alonzo. 

The digital event is structured as a late night show that will feature comedy, music and lively conversations about feminism, climate justice, coping with Covid-19 and more. Guests include Jane Fonda, Gloria Steinem, George Lopez, Eva Longoria, Martin Sheen, Alfre Woodard, Esai Morales, Mark Hamill, Benjamin Bratt, Zoe Saldana, Matt McGorry, Joe & Jill Biden, Bill & Hillary Clinton, Kamala Harris, John Leguizamo, Danny Glover, Gina Rodriguez, Kerry Kennedy, Patrisse Cullors, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Common, Aloe Blacc, Maya Jupiter, Edward James Olmos, Kate del Castillo, the cast of Penny Dreadful and more. Musical guests include Carlos Santana and his wife Cindy Blackman, Sheila E. and her father legendary Latin percussionist Pete Escovedo, Grammy award-winning musical groups Ozomatli, and the Grammy nominated all-female mariachi group Flor de Toloache.

For interviews with Dolores Huerta, please contact Damairis Lao at dlao@doloreshuerta.org.

###

DOLORES HUERTA FOUNDATION PROMOTES FREE COVID-19 TESTING IN KERN COUNTY

Dolores Huerta and Leticia Perez encourage Kern County residents to get tested for Covid-19 to safely reopen society

MEDIA CONTACT: Damairis Lao | dlao@doloreshuerta.org

[BAKERSFIELD, CA]  WEDNESDAY, MAY 13TH, 2020- The Dolores Huerta Foundation in collaboration with Kern County Supervisor Leticia Perez have created videos in English and Spanish to promote the new Covid-19 testing sites in Bakersfield to share widely on social media. Press is asked to air the videos and publish Dolores’ statement to spread awareness to the local community.

According to the Kern County Public Health Services Department, Hispanic people make up over 65% of Covid-19 cases in Kern County, a higher rate than all other ethnic groups combined. Many are at a higher risk because they are essential workers on the front lines of the pandemic. Yet, there are more barriers for Hispanic communities to access important health information and resources, in part because of language barriers or fear over their undocumented status. In order to control this pandemic, it is critical that special efforts be made to reach out to this community. More information about the testing site location, operating hours, and appointment process is provided in the transcript below.

Transcription:

“Hi, this is Dolores Huerta, bringing you information about testing for the Covid-19 virus that is free and open to everyone regardless of symptoms. The entire test takes only 15 minutes and the test results can be mailed to you within 24 hours at your email address and people can get tested as many times as they want. But remember to get tested, you have to make an appointment ahead of time. You can register at ProjectBaseline.com.

The testing site for Covid-19 is at the Richard Prado Center, 2101 Ridge Road at Mt. Vernon. The site is open from Sunday through Friday from 8 am to 11 am and from noon 12 to 2 pm. It is closed on Saturdays. This special test site at the Richard Prado Center is for us, our communities of color and our low-income communities, so that we can have access to free, safe, reliable testing and also to get information so that we can open up our society in a responsible way to make sure everyone is safe.

But we need your help to encourage everyone to get tested so that we can limit the risk of exposure. It is important to get tested whether you have symptoms or not to protect yourself, your family, and our communities. We can do this. ¡SI SE PUEDE!”

###

DOLORES HUERTA FOUNDATION RESPONSE TO GOV. NEWSOM’S ANNOUNCEMENT OF ASSISTANCE FOR UNDOCUMENTED DURING COVID-19

PRESS RELEASE

MEDIA CONTACT: Damairis Lao | dlao@doloreshuerta.org

[BAKERSFIELD, CA] APRIL 16, 2020 – Dolores Huerta, Founder and President of the Dolores Huerta Foundation, issued the following statement today following Gov. Newsom’s announcement of $125 million in financial assistance for undocumented Californians:

“I want to thank the Governor and the leaders of the legislature for their leadership and courageous actions to secure financial assistance for undocumented Californians. They are integral to our economy and are most disproportionately impacted during this crisis. Farm workers, homecare workers, and childcare workers are essential frontline workers who are working every day to feed the nation and keep our communities safe but are especially vulnerable in this crisis.

We will continue working with our leaders in Sacramento to ensure we secure ongoing financial assistance for the lowest-income Californians. It has become even more evident during this crisis just how interconnected and interdependent we all are but we should not forget those who we cannot see, those who are invisible. To ensure a strong and thriving California for all, it is critical that we support everyone, including the undocumented, in our community.”

###

DOLORES HUERTA FOUNDATION ASKS THE COMMUNITY TO UPLIFT FARMWORKERS ON CESAR CHAVEZ DAY AND THROUGHOUT COVID CRISIS

PRESS RELEASE

MEDIA CONTACT: Damairis Lao | dlao@doloreshuerta.org

[BAKERSFIELD, CA] TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2020- Dolores Huerta Foundation celebrates Cesar Chavez day by asking people to stand with farm workers and advocate for their well being. They are among the most vulnerable populations in this devastating pandemic. DHF is asking people to write letters to the governor and contact their elected officials to remind them that farmworkers, regardless of immigration status, need immediate support to stay fed & housed. We can meet this moment & protect our most valuable and vulnerable members of society.

Dolores Huerta, President and Founder of the Dolores Huerta Foundation and Co-Founder of the United Farm Workers stated, “Today, we celebrate Cesar Chavez on what would have been his 93rd birthday by honoring the farmworkers who continue to work every single day to produce the food that nourishes us. Farmworkers cannot shelter at home during this pandemic. Farmworkers are part of our frontline defenders, an extremely necessary part of our society that we all depend upon to live and survive. Farmworkers need to be recognized and respected for their dedication and courage and be granted the resources to survive the pandemic like other workers in our country regardless of their immigration status.

Cesar brought that message to the world and demanded dignity and human rights for farmworkers. Let us continue Cesar’s journey and honor him by continuing his quest until all farmworker families, men, women and their children are treated equally with living wages, an equitable education and full representation. 

Cesar also respected and advocated for the protection of Mother Earth. Earth Day, which we started 50 years ago, was one of Cesar’s highest priorities. He was a leading spokesperson for protecting the environment, animals and nature. During this difficult time that we are living in, let’s remember Cesar, his vision, his work, his principals and the many sacrifices he made by joining his journey for justice.”

PARENTS, STUDENTS, EDUCATORS, AND COMMUNITY MEMBERS MARCH FOR EDUCATIONAL JUSTICE IN KHSD

Kern High School District students, parents, and community demand a quality education for black and brown youth

MEDIA ADVISORY JANUARY 30, 2020

PRESS CONTACT: Damairis Lao | dlao@doloreshuerta.org

WHAT:  March for Educational Justice

WHO:  The Dolores Huerta Foundation as part of the Kern Education Justice Collaborative (KEJC), KHSD students, parents, educators, and community members

WHEN:  Thursday, January 30th, 2020 at 5:30 pm

WHERE:  March starts at Ross Store at 3761 Ming Ave, Bakersfield, CA 93309 and ends at West High School at 1200 New Stine Rd, Bakersfield, CA 93309

PHOTO OP: Press Conference at 6:30 pm in front of West High School after march. Speakers include parents, youth, and teachers who will list out their demands. 

 *Note: There will be two press check-in points to pick up your press pass. One will be during the march if you’re walking with the demonstrators. The other will be at the press conference at 6:30 pm. You do not need to check in at both.

BACKGROUND: Six years ago, community members, civil rights lawyers, and community organizations filed a lawsuit against the Kern High School District (KHSD) to end discriminatory discipline practices that targeted black and brown students and deprived them of their right to an education.

This Thursday, the KEJC and community members will demand the KHSD to be transparent in its progress reports and to faithfully implement the agreements of the settlement that will create a positive school environment and improve social, emotional, and academic outcomes for black and brown students.

To this date:

  • KHSD has failed to hire diverse teachers. This year, KHSD only hired 2% black teachers, 29% latino, and 68% white. 
  • While suspensions and expulsions have gone significantly down, students are being pushed into continuation schools at alarming rates. Continuation schools don’t have the same resources as comprehensive schools, meaning that students will not be college ready when graduating. In 2017-18, continuation schools had a 48% graduation rate. Although African American students only make up 8% of the KHSD population, they attend continuation schools at higher rates. For example, Vista Continuation School has 14% African American students and only has a 36% graduation rate. In 2018-19, Vista West Continuation School had 21 Special education students and only one special education teacher. 
  • Black students continue to have disproportionate rates for voluntary transfers, involuntary transfers, and are still being suspended at 2-3 more times than their white peers.

STATEMENT FROM ACTIVIST DOLORES HUERTA ON THE CLIMATE CRISIS AT “FIRE DRILL FRIDAY”

Jane Fonda’s 11th consecutive “Fire Drill Friday” focused on climate change’s impact on health

PRESS RELEASE

MEDIA CONTACT: Damairis Lao | dlao@doloreshuerta.org

[WASHINGTON, D.C.] December 20, 2019– 

“I am honored to join Jane Fonda on the eve of her 82nd birthday, Gloria Steinem and over 100 people today at the Hart Senate Office Building in Washington DC to protest the climate crisis. Not enough people are taking the climate crisis seriously.

We are gradually ruining our planet, our existence is at stake. Air pollution affects all of us. It affects our food supply. People need to realize that our lives and the health of our children are affected.

I’m from Bakersfield in California’s San Joaquin Valley. Sixty percent of our nation’s food supply comes from the San Joaquin Valley of California, an area experiencing the worst air quality in the nation. We owe something to the farm workers that are working and living in the worst climate in the country as they work so hard to feed our country and the world.

We must engage our decision makers to take action. The best action we can take is to meet with local politicians, state representatives, and congressional representatives to pass a Green New Deal, to provide public transportation, to demand an end to fracking, to protect our water supply, and to transition from gas to clean energy.

We have to get involved to stop environmental injustice and work together for environmental justice. We have the power to protect ourselves, future generations, and our humanity.”

¡Si Se Puede!

Dolores Huerta

President, Dolores Huerta Foundation

Media Advisory: Bakersfield LGBTQ and the Dolores Huerta Foundation to host “Stand Up, Speak Out” March, Sun. 6/11/17, 8:30am

Immediate Release: June 9, 2017
Contact: Dean Welliver
DHF Equality Organizer
dwelliver@doloreshuerta.org
661-322-3033 ext. 1218

 

Bakersfield LGBTQ and the Dolores Huerta Foundation to host
“Stand Up, Speak Out” March

Who: Bakersfield LGBTQ , the Dolores Huerta Foundation, members and allies of the LGBTQ Community
What: “Stand Up, Speak Out” March and Rally to commemorate and honor victims of June 11th, 2016 Pulse Nightclub massacre and to advocate for LGBTQ rights
When: Sunday, June 11th, 2017 from 8:30 – 10:30 AM
Where: Meeting point HomeGoods parking lot (5510 Stockdale Hwy) and march to First Congregational Church (5 Real Road) in Bakersfield, California

Bakersfield, CA – Bakersfield LGBTQ and the Dolores Huerta Foundation have joined forces to host the Bakersfield “Stand Up, Speak Out March” in conjunction with the National Pride March on Washington D.C. and solidarity marches across the nation on Sunday, June 11th, 2017. The march will commemorate the one-year anniversary of the Pulse Orlando Nightclub shooting, where 49 attendees were murdered and 53 others injured at the gay nightclub on Latin night. This massacre marks the largest hate crime targeted at the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer/Questioning (LGBTQ) community in American History.

The “Stand Up, Speak Out” March will honor and remember those who lost their lives or were injured in the June 11th massacre and mobilize the Bakersfield community to advocate for legislation and policies that promote the well-being of LGBTQ persons and their access to opportunities for success locally and around the world.

The march will end at First Congregational Church with speakers that seek to mobilize people into action to:
· Support Health Care for All

· Embrace Trans People

· Fight Bi-Erasure

· Validate Non-Binary People

· End Stigma of HIV

· Stop the Chechen Genocide

Bakersfield LGBTQ and the Dolores Huerta Foundation call on the Bakersfield LGBTQ community to urge their representatives to intervene in the budding genocide of gay men in Chechnya to ensure equality and safety for all LGBTQ people globally.

In Chechnya, Russia men who have sex with other men or are suspected of being gay are being blackmailed, sent to concentration camps, tortured with beatings and electro-shocks, and being killed all for being LGBTQ. Alvi Karimov, spokesman for Ramzan Kadyrov the Head of the Chechen Republic, has disputed the claims of anti-gay repression stating that there are no gay people living in Chechnya. In an interview he stated that; “You cannot detain and persecute people who simply do not exist in the republic. If there were such people in Chechnya, the law-enforcement organs wouldn’t need to have anything to do with them because their relatives would send them somewhere from which there is no returning.”

Attendees will learn how to support the bisexual community. Bi-erasure is the tendency to question or deny the legitimacy and existence of bisexuality. According to the Bisexual Resource Center, bisexuals face higher rates of anxiety, depression, STIs, heart disease, and tobacco use than heterosexuals, gay men, and lesbians. Fighting bi-erasure is paramount to the inclusion of bisexuals in society and to reducing health disparities for bisexuals.

Attendees will also be asked to sign a pledge card asking their legislators and elected officials to support legislation such as SB 179, the Gender Recognition Act, SB 239 Modernizing Discriminatory HIV Criminalization Laws, and SB 421 Tiered System for California Sex Offender Registry.
SB 179, the Gender Recognition Act of 2017, authored by Sen. Toni Atkins (D-San Diego) and Sen. Scott Wiener, will enable transgender, intersex and nonbinary people to obtain state-issued identity documents that accurately reflect their gender identity. The bill creates a third, nonbinary gender marker on California birth certificates, drivers’ licenses, identity cards and gender-change court orders, in addition to streamlining the processes for a person to change their gender marker and name on these identifying documents. This bill will make California the first state to legally allow someone to be legally recognized as non-male and non-female.

SB 239, authored by Senator Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco) and Assemblymember Todd Gloria (D-San Diego), modernizes California laws criminalizing and stigmatizing people living with HIV to reflect current understanding of HIV prevention and treatment. It eliminates HIV-specific criminal laws that impose harsh and draconian penalties, including for activities that pose no risk of transmitting HIV. This bill is supported by public health officials because laws that criminalize HIV discourage people from getting tested and from seeking treatment, which impedes public health objectives of eliminating transmission of HIV. SB 239 would make HIV subject to the laws that apply to other serious communicable diseases, removing discrimination and stigma for people living with HIV and furthering public health. The bill is cosponsored by the Equality California, ACLU of California, APLA Health, Black AIDS Institute, Lambda Legal and Positive Women’s Network – USA.

SB 421 would replace California’s existing universal lifetime registration requirement for sex offenses with a tiered system based on the seriousness of the crime, the risk of reoffending and criminal history. There are over 100,000 registrants in California, far more than any other state, and California is one of only four states with a universal lifetime registry. Equality California is cosponsoring this bill to address the unfair circumstance of LGBT people who were targeted and often entrapped on charges that required registration when their actual actions hurt no one, including for simply engaging in same-sex contact when that action was criminalized in the past. These members of the LGBT community were required to register as sex offenders for life even though their convictions are now decades old and the law and its enforcement have changed, and the basis for many of these arrests was due to anti-LGBT discrimination and police entrapment. This bill would remove these people from the registry along with others in similar circumstances and put a new, efficient, risk-based system in place. This bill is cosponsored by Equality California, the Los Angeles District Attorney’s Office, the California Sex Offender Management Board (CASOMB) and the California Coalition Against Sexual Assault (CALCASA).

###

Media Advisory: DHF Teens 4 Equality PhotoVoice Youth Townhall 6-9-17

Immediate Release: June 2, 2017

Contact: Dean Welliver
Equality Organizer
dwelliver@doloreshuerta.org
O: 661-322-3033 ext. 1218 C: 661-331-4755

Dolores Huerta Foundation to host Bakersfield Community Health Photovoice Townhall

Who: Dolores Huerta Foundation’s Teen 4 Equality in collaboration with UCLA and Cultiva la Salud (Cultivating Health)

What: Photovoice Townhall explores health challenges and successes in Kern County through youth’s eyes

When: Friday, June 9th, 2017 from
5:00 – 6:30 PM

Where: Kern County Superintendent of Schools Access Building, 1330 Truxtun Avenue, Bakersfield

Bakersfield, CA – The Dolores Huerta Foundation will be hosting a Bakersfield Community Health Photovoice Townhall to engage educators, policy makers, elected officials, and the general community in conversations about the health challenges and successes that youth have identified in their community through the Photovoice project. Confirmed attendees include, Bryan Batey, KHSD Board of Trustees member, and Bob Smith, Bakersfield City Council Ward 4 and Vice Mayor. Other elected officials, including Rudy Salas and Zach Scrivner, have committed to sending representatives.

Photovoice pairs photographical documentation and written narrative to show decision makers health through the eyes of local youth. Photovoice allows youth the opportunity to share the solutions youth have envisioned to issues such as safe routes to school, healthy school meals, improved road maintenance, and improved access to public transportation.

The Dolores Huerta Foundation is a (501) non-profit dedicated to creating networks of healthy, organized communities pursuing social justice through systematic and structural transformation. Our youth program, Teens 4 Equality, has partnered with UCLA and Cultiva La Salud to conduct this Bakersfield Community Health Photovoice Townhall. This project offers high school youth in Kern County the opportunity to share their photos and narratives representing health challenges or successes in Kern County. The purpose is to inform and engage educators, policy makers, elected officials, and the general community in conversations about how to support these successes and what solutions the youth envision for the challenges. This is an opportunity engage with young people in our community who are actively seeking solutions to community issues that directly affect them.

###

Media Advisory: KEJC offers LCAP workshops and encourages community to get involved in school budget process

 

Immediate Release: May 22, 2017

Contact: Gerald Cantu, Ph.D., Civic Engagement Director,

gcantu@doloreshuerta.org, O: 661-322-3033 ext. 1209, C: 661-249-0219

 

Kern Education Justice Collaborative offers LCAP workshops and encourages community to get involved in school budget process

Who: Kern Education Justice Collaborative, Dolores Huerta Foundation and Faith in Kern

What: Press Conference to announce free LCAP involvement training sessions and to encourage community participation in the LCAP Process

Where: Bakersfield High School, Corner of 14th and G Street, Bakersfield, CA (Across the street from BHS Harvey Auditorium)

When: Tuesday, May 23, 2017 at 5:00 p.m.

Bakersfield, CA – Kern High School District’s proposed 2017 Local Control and Accountability Plan (LCAP) has been released. LCAP plans will soon be released by all local school districts. At its core, the LCAP is designed to ensure that everyone has a voice in determining how funds can best support students. The Kern Education Justice Collaborative is holding a press conference to encourage the community to get involved and to announce a series of free workshops designed to train parents, students, and community members on how to provide valuable input to their respective districts on how to best allocate available resources to meet students’ needs. Parent engagement makes a significant difference in a child’s relationship to school and success. Studies show that students exhibit stronger attendance, pass more classes, earn more credits, are more likely to graduate on time, and less likely to drop-out. Students earn higher grade point averages and score higher on standardized tests. Students also improve behavior both at home and school.

In 2013, the state dramatically changed the way it funds school districts across the state by adopting the new Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF). In addition to reversing cuts made during the Great Recession, the new law directs added resources to higher-need school districts, by giving them Supplemental and Concentration grant funding – equity-based dollars – tied to the number of low income, foster youth, and English learner students in each district. LCFF also gives districts more flexibility than they’d had in the past by replacing a host of “categorical” funding programs, which had strict requirements on what state dollars must be spent on, with more flexible grants that can be allocated to meet local needs.

To ensure that districts used their new flexibility wisely, the state also required them to meet new transparency and accountability standards. In particular, districts are required to publish a Local Control Accountability Plan (LCAP) each year, which lays out their priorities and lists the specific actions and funding the district will leverage to accomplish those goals. Districts are required to consult with the community, including students, parents, and teachers, while developing their LCAPs.

The result of these changes is that districts are seeing increased investment from the state, and are also being called upon to more effectively match resources to student need. The Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) is the formula for determining the level of state funding provided to districts across California. The Local Control and Accountability Plan (LCAP) is LCFF’s vehicle for transparency and engagement. It is the way that school districts are expected to share and collect data, needs, actions and anticipated outcomes that guide the use of available funding. The intent of the legislation behind the LCFF is “equity” meaning the LCAP budget should reflect an increase and improved services for the neediest students: low Income, English Language Learners and Foster Youth.

In the proposed LCAP, more than half of KHSD’s equity-based dollars will go to district-wide expenditures (55%), rather than being targeted to specific campuses. Of the $48 million KHSD receives for high-need students, only $15.7 million, or 32%, is allocated by school site. While many of the District’s campuses are likely to need the services and programs set out in the “All Sites” category, it nonetheless appears that KHSD can be more aggressive about ensuring that more dollars go to the specific schools with the highest need.

Only 32% of Kern High graduates meet the A-G eligibility requirements with a C or better, allowing them to enter a four-year public university – this is more than 10 points below the state average of 43%. This overall level reflects considerable disparities: white students fare the best at 38%, Latina/o students at 29%, and Black students at 25%. The socioeconomically disadvantaged are only passing A-G courses at 21%. Only 1.5% of English language learners are UC/CSU eligible.

Kern High School District has high suspension rates with 5,471 out-of-school suspensions, with 22% of suspensions for willful defiance, plus 2,760 in-school suspensions with 90% being attributed to willful defiance. African Americans represent 16% of all school suspensions even though they represent only 5.9% of the population. For health indicators, only 20% of students are scoring in the healthy fitness zone for 9th graders for body composition and 11.7% for aerobic capacity. School disciplinary policies and parent engagement are two significant factors that not only impact a student’s educational outcome but also their health.

Harsh disciplinary school practices, such as suspension and expulsion, have a negative correlation with student health. They push students away from having a strong level of connectedness with school, which is an important protective factor for preventing tobacco, alcohol and other drug use. Increased parent engagement is another protective factor to prevent these behaviors, and improve positive academic achievement. It is crucial that the community get involved in the LCAP process to address these disparities and make recommendations to help Kern High School District take advantage of the changes created by LCFF to improve the health and educational outcomes of its students.

Trainings are as follows:

BAKERSFIELD WORKSHOPS – KHSD/BCSD

Session 1: General LCAP Overview
Wednesday, May 24, 2017
5:30 PM – 8 PM
Access Building
1330 Truxtun Ave.
Bakersfield, CA 93301

Session 2: LCAP Analysis and Recommendations

Wednesday, May 31, 2017
5:30 PM – 8 PM
506 E. Brundage Lane
Bakersfield, CA 93307

SOUTH KERN /GREENFIELD WORKSHOPS – AUSD/LESD/VSD/GUSD

Session 1: General LCAP Overview
Thursday, May 18, 2017
5:30 PM – 8 PM

Session 2: LCAP Analysis
Monday, May 22, 2017
5:30 PM – 8 PM

Session 3: Identify LCAP Priorities
Thursday, May 25, 2017
5:30 PM – 8 PM

Session 4: Determine LCAP Recommendations
Tuesday, May 30, 2017
5:30 PM – 8 PM

141 N. A St., Suite E
Arvin, CA 93203

Dinner and childcare will be provided.

###

Media Advisory: KEJC Press Conference to announce LCAP workshops and encourage community involvement in school budget process 5-23-17, 5pm

 

Immediate Release: May 23, 2017
Contact: Gerald Cantu, Ph.D.
Civic Engagement Director
gcantu@doloreshuerta.org
O: 661-322-3033 ext. 1209, C: 661-249-0219

 

Kern Education Justice Collaborative offers LCAP workshops and encourages community to get involved in school budget process

Who: Kern Education Justice Collaborative, Dolores Huerta Foundation and Faith in Kern

What: Press Conference to announce free LCAP involvement training sessions and to encourage community participation in the LCAP Process

Where: Bakersfield High School, Corner of 14th and G Street, Bakersfield, CA (Across the street from BHS Harvey Auditorium)

When: Tuesday, May 23, 2017 at 5:00 p.m.

Bakersfield, CA – Kern High School District’s proposed 2017 Local Control and Accountability Plan (LCAP) has been released. LCAP plans will soon be released by all local school districts. At its core, the LCAP is designed to ensure that everyone has a voice in determining how funds can best support students. The Kern Education Justice Collaborative is holding a press conference to encourage the community to get involved and to announce a series of free workshops designed to train parents, students, and community members on how to provide valuable input to their respective districts on how to best allocate available resources to meet students’ needs. Parent engagement makes a significant difference in a child’s relationship to school and success. Studies show that students exhibit stronger attendance, pass more classes, earn more credits, are more likely to graduate on time, and less likely to drop-out. Students earn higher grade point averages and score higher on standardized tests. Students also improve behavior both at home and school.

In 2013, the state dramatically changed the way it funds school districts across the state by adopting the new Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF). In addition to reversing cuts made during the Great Recession, the new law directs added resources to higher-need school districts, by giving them Supplemental and Concentration grant funding – equity-based dollars – tied to the number of low income, foster youth, and English learner students in each district. LCFF also gives districts more flexibility than they’d had in the past by replacing a host of “categorical” funding programs, which had strict requirements on what state dollars must be spent on, with more flexible grants that can be allocated to meet local needs.

To ensure that districts used their new flexibility wisely, the state also required them to meet new transparency and accountability standards. In particular, districts are required to publish a Local Control Accountability Plan (LCAP) each year, which lays out their priorities and lists the specific actions and funding the district will leverage to accomplish those goals. Districts are required to consult with the community, including students, parents, and teachers, while developing their LCAPs.

The result of these changes is that districts are seeing increased investment from the state, and are also being called upon to more effectively match resources to student need. The Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) is the formula for determining the level of state funding provided to districts across California. The Local Control and Accountability Plan (LCAP) is LCFF’s vehicle for transparency and engagement. It is the way that school districts are expected to share and collect data, needs, actions and anticipated outcomes that guide the use of available funding. The intent of the legislation behind the LCFF is “equity” meaning the LCAP budget should reflect an increase and improved services for the neediest students: low Income, English Language Learners and Foster Youth.
*In the proposed LCAP, more than half of KHSD’s equity-based dollars will go to district-wide expenditures (55%), rather than being targeted to specific. Of the $48 million KHSD receives for high-need students, only $15.7 million, or 32%, is allocated by school site. While many of the District’s campuses are likely to need the services and programs set out in the “All Sites” category, it nonetheless appears that KHSD can be more aggressive about ensuring that more dollars go to the specific schools with the highest need.

*Only 32% of Kern High graduates meet the A-G eligibility requirements with a C or better, allowing them to enter a four-year public university – this is more than 10 points below the state average of 43%. This overall level reflects considerable disparities: white students fare the best at 38%, Latina/o students at 29%, and Black students at 25%. The socioeconomically disadvantaged are only passing A-G courses at 21%. Only 1.5% of English language learners are UC/CSU eligible.

*Kern High School District has high suspension rates with 5,471 out-of-school suspensions, with 22% of suspensions for willful defiance, plus 2,760 in-school suspensions with 90% being attributed to willful defiance. African Americans represent 16% of all school suspensions even though they represent only 5.9% of the population. For health indicators, only 20% of students are scoring in the healthy fitness zone for 9th graders for body composition and 11.7% for aerobic capacity. School disciplinary policies and parent engagement are two significant factors that not only impact a student’s educational outcome but also their health.

Harsh disciplinary school practices, such as suspension and expulsion, have a negative correlation with student health. They push students away from having a strong level of connectedness with school, which is an important protective factor for preventing tobacco, alcohol and other drug use. Increased parent engagement is another protective factor to prevent these behaviors, and improve positive academic achievement. It is crucial that the community get involved in the LCAP process to address these disparities and make recommendations to help Kern High School District take advantage of the changes created by LCFF to improve the health and educational outcomes of its.

*Information derived from the Advancement Project Policy Brief 2017. The full text is available upon request.

Trainings are as follows:

BAKERSFIELD WORKSHOPS – KHSD/BCSD

Session 1: General LCAP Overview
Wednesday, May 24, 2017
5:30 PM – 8 PM
Access Building
1330 Truxtun Ave.
Bakersfield, CA 93301

Session 2: LCAP Analysis and Recommendations
Wednesday, May 31, 2017
5:30 PM – 8 PM
506 E. Brundage Lane
Bakersfield, CA 93307

SOUTH KERN /GREENFIELD WORKSHOPS – AUSD/LESD/VSD/GUSD

Session 1: General LCAP Overview
Thursday, May 18, 2017
5:30 PM – 8 PM

Session 2: LCAP Analysis
Monday, May 22, 2017
5:30 PM – 8 PM

Session 3: Identify LCAP Priorities
Thursday, May 25, 2017
5:30 PM – 8 PM

Session 4: Determine LCAP Recommendations
Tuesday, May 30, 2017
5:30 PM – 8 PM

141 N. A. St., Suite E
Arvin, CA 93203

Dinner and childcare will be provided at all trainings.

Training based on A Parent’s Guide to School Funding: Learning the Fundamentals About LCFF and LCAP, produced by Families in Schools: Building Partnerships for Student Success. Full text available upon request.

###

Media Advisory: Dolores Huerta Foundation Presents Free Screening of “Raising Zoey”

Who: The Dolores Huerta Foundation in collaboration with Building Healthy Communities, South Kern and the California Endowment

What: Presentation of the film “Raising Zoey” followed by a panel discussion with film stars Ofelia and Zoey and director Dante Alencastre

When: Wednesday, May 17, 2017, 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Where: Maya Cinemas, 1000 California Ave., Bakersfield, CA 93304

Register on Eventbrite to RSVP @https://www.facebook.com/events/267825010346230

Bakersfield, CA – Raising Zoey is a heartwarming film about a family faced with the insurmountable challenges of a youth’s gender transition. This pioneering documentary, RAISING ZOEY, which follows one of Los Angeles’ bravest, and youngest, trans rights activists, Zoey Luna (last year’s LA Pride’s Grand Marshall) just after winning a case against her school district for discrimination, as she begins hormone treatments and publicly advocates for change with her mother and sister always by her side. From Latino filmmaker, Dante Alencastre.

Instinctively and unconditionally supporting her daughter’s journey, Ofelia reaches out to a community beyond her resources for guidance and knowledge. “Zoey is not special because she is trans. She is special because she is my child.”

Join Zoey Luna, her mother Ofelia, and director Dante Alencastre for a panel after the screening

The Dolores Huerta Foundation Equality Program partners with community organizations and community members throughout Kern County and California to advance and protect the rights of the LGBT community while promoting inclusion and their wellbeing. The Dolores Huerta Foundation Equality Team has initiated a youth-led bilingual public awareness campaign to promote family acceptance, safer school climate, and come together to discuss strategies and solutions for improving issues negatively affecting LGBT youth. In addition, they have created public education workshops and trainings to inform allies and the community at large in Kern County about LGBT identity, rights, and culture.

Contact: Moises Duran, DHF Equality Organizer
(661) 578-0140, mduran@doloreshuerta.org

 

Media Advisory: KHSD Board Ignores Community on Selection of New Superintendent

Media Advisory: KHSD Board Ignores Community on Selection of New Superintendent

WHAT: Press Conference / Community Protest of Kern High School District Board Meeting

WHEN: Monday, March 3, 2014 6:30 pm Protest

WHERE: KHSD Board Offices, 5801 Sundale Ave., Bakersfield, CA 93309

BACKGROUND: At a KHSD Board Meeting on Feb. 3, 2014, parents and community members expressed their concerns regarding the limitations of an internal search and asked the board to conduct an open search for a new superintendent.

1. On Feb 24, 2014 the board had a special meeting – with little advance notice, at 7:30 in the morning – as an opportunity for public comment to hear community members regarding the new superintendent position. The DHF Staff, CRLA and concerned parents again asked the board to consider open search and requested a time extension for the search.

2. On March 3, 2014, the board held another special meeting. The DHF presented nearly 700 signatures (in addition to the 200 collected online) of concerned Kern Community Members and asked the board to reconsider their refusal to conduct an open search.

3. On March 3, 2014 the KHSD officially announced that a new superintendent had been chosen.

The district continues to face challenges in regards to discipline and lack of ethnic and cultural representation in the leadership and staff compared to the demographics of the students within the district. The community believes there is a strong impetus to change the status quo and bring in a superintendent with a new perspective and fresh leadership ideas.

“We are extremely disappointed but not surprised about the decision of the Kern High School District Board to promote the new Superintendent from within the ranks of KHSD. They refuse to respect the wishes of the community. We are subject to the decisions of an old boys network,” Dolores Huerta Foundation President, Dolores Huerta.

CONTACT: Erika Brooks, DHF Education Director (559) 909-1485
Camila Chavez, DHF Executive Director (415) 377-4184

Media Advisory: DHF CEIO Obamacare Enrollment Event

Media Advisory:

Obamacare Enrollment Event!

What: Obamacare Enrollment Event

Who: Dolores Huerta Foundation as part of the Coalition to Enroll Immigrants in Obamacare

When: Sunday, February 16, 2013, 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m

Where: Fiesta Foods, 1631 Beale Ave, Bakersfield, CA 93305

Contact: Camila Chavez, Executive Director, Dolores Huerta Foundation
(661) 322-3033 Cell

Background: Bakersfield, CA – The Coalition to Enroll Immigrants in Obamacare is hosting the first of a series of Obamacare Enrollment Events as part of a campaign to encourage the enrollment of the uninsured Latino Immigrant Population of Kern County by educating them about the benefits of having health insurance and providing resources to enroll in public and private insurance.

The event will be held at Fiesta Foods, and is hosted by owner, Manuel G. Lerma, life long community activist and volunteer fellow for the Organizing For America National Program. He is committed to organizing his community to help achieve enactment of the agenda Americans voted for in 2012. One important goal is promoting health care for every American through the Affordable Care Act

The Coalition is comprised of members of the DHF (Dolores Huerta Foundation), CHIRLA (The Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles), SEIU 521 (Service Employees International Union, Local 521), and the UFW Foundation (The United Farm Workers Foundation) It is part of a larger effort to drive health care enrollment of the more than 52,000 eligible uninsured citizens of Kern and Tulare Counties in qualified health plans. The CEIO is working in partnership with The California Endowment, Covered California, and partner organizations intending to reach millions of uninsured and subsidy eligible Californians through outreach and education.

Download a PDF of this press release

[wpdm_file id=1]